ON-LINE VIRTUAL WORLDS AND SHIPS

---------------------- 

SMS Schleswig-Holstein (1906) SHIPS PLANS AND IMAGES FOR MODEL MAKERS

CLICK ON PICTURES FOR LARGER IMAGES

STD SIDE VEIW

UPPER DECKS DETAILS

STD SECTION DETAIL VEIW

UPPER DECK DETAILS

MIDSHIPS DETAILS

LOWER DECK DETAILS

LOWER DECK DETAILS

LOWER DECK DETAILS

SMS Schleswig-Holstein at sea

-----

Name: Schleswig-Holstein


Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel

Ordered: 11 June 1904
Laid down: 18 August 1905
Launched: 17 December 1906
Commissioned: 6 July 1908


Fate: Sunk by bombs 1944; scuttled 21 March 1945; raised and beached for use as target 1948; still remains.


General characteristics


Class and type: Deutschland-class pre-dreadnought battleship


Displacement:

13,200 t (13,000 long tons) normal
14,218 t (13,993 long tons) full load

Length: 127.60 m (418 ft 8 in)
Beam: 22.20 m (72 ft 10 in)
Draft: 8.21 m (26 ft 11 in)


Installed power: 16,767 ihp (12,503 kW)


Propulsion:

3 shafts
3 triple expansion steam engines
12 boilers

Speed: 19.1 knots (35.4 km/h; 22.0 mph)


Range: 5,720 nmi (10,590 km; 6,580 mi); 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph)


Complement:

35 officers
708 enlisted men

Armament:

At construction:


2 × 2 – 28 cm (11 in) SK L/40 guns
14 × 17 cm (6.7 in) SK L/40 guns (casemated)
22 × 8.8 cm (3.5 in) SK L/45 naval guns (shielded/casemated)
6 × 45 cm (18 in) torpedo tubes (submerged)


Armament in 1926:


2 × 2 – 28 cm SK L/40 guns
12 × 15 cm SK L/45 guns (casemated)
8 × 8.8 cm (3.5 in) SK L/45 naval guns (shieded)
4 × 50 cm (20 in) torpedo tubes (casemated)


Armament in 1939:


2 × 2 – 28 cm SK L/40 guns
10 × 15 cm SK L/45 guns (casemated: removed 1940)
4 × 8.8 cm (3.5 in) SK L/45 anti-aircraft guns
4 × 3.7 cm (1.5 in) guns (2×2)

Armor:

Belt: 240 mm (9.4 in)
Turrets: 280 mm (11 in)
Deck: 40 mm (1.6 in)


Commanders:

Gustav Kieseritzky
Walter Hennecke
Gustav Kleikamp

---------

SMS Schleswig-Holsteinwas the last of the five Deutschland-class battleships built by the German Kaiserliche Marine.

The ships of her class were already outdated by the time they entered service.

They were inferior in size, armor, firepower and speed to the new generation of Dreadnought battleships.

During World War I, she saw front-line service in the II Battle Squadron of the High Seas Fleet.

At the Battle of Jutland on 31 May – 1 June 1916. Schleswig-Holstein saw action and was hit by one large-caliber shell.

After the battle, Schleswig-Holstein was relegated to guard duty in the mouth of the Elbe River before being decommissioned in late 1917.

Schleswig-Holstein was one of the few battleships permitted for Germany by the terms of the Treaty of Versailles.

She was pressed back into service in the 1920s. and in 1935, the ship was converted into a training ship for naval cadets.

Schleswig-Holstein fired the first shots of World War II at the Polish base at Danzig's Westerplatte in the early morning of 1st September 1939.

The ship was used as a training vessel for the most of the war, and was sunk by British bombers in Gotenhafen in December 1944.

Schleswig-Holstein was later salvaged, beached and used by the Soviet Navy as a target.

As of 1990, the ship's bell was on display in the Bundeswehr Military History Museum in Dresden.

-----

(c) Copyright .................Virtual Dockyard.....................2017